SEEQ Days

Below is the first ever EEROM CELL design utilizing Tunneling over a thin oxide
region for both program and erase and a cell architecture to develop the first ever EEPROM device the 2816 with 100k endurance and the ability to program and erase 8 bit words like a real memory.  The Intel 2816 was the first memory device to pave the way in the up and coming Flash revolution.





Leaving Intel he founded Seeq Technologies with other Intel employees. In 1981, George developed an improved version of EEPROM "A 5V-only 16K EEPROM utilizing oxynitride dielectrics" that could be programmed and erased on the system board for the first time by utilizing a 5-volt pump and on-chip High Voltage Generation. It was this ability to program and erase at system levels that allowed EEPROM/FLASH devices to be incorporated in all computers, laptops, cellphones etc.

A 5V-only 16K EEPROM utilizing oxynitride dielectrics and using a 5-volt only Charge Pump ISSCC  Feb 1982
                              



Articles about George

Intel Days



While attending Stanford University, George interviewed at Intel Corporation. At this time Intel had a new project to develop nonvolatile memory technologies and a new semiconductor chip. After learning about the opportunities to work on these new technologies during the interview, George left AMI for Intel. 

While at Intel George became an expert in semiconductor device physics, circuit design, and semiconductor fabrication processes. George's first task, to design an N-channel EPROM, different from its predecessor the P-channel EPROM, that would work with the microprocessors Intel was developing at the time. The project known as and defined as the 2708, was introduced by Intel in 1975.




George's invention of the N-channel EPROM was important, as it was the first time a positive voltage was used for a nonvolatile memory device, thus requiring significantly lower voltage than it's P-channel predecessor. The 2708 was a revolutionary chip, no on else in the industry had the technology, and Intel revenues began to grow due to demand for it, particularly for use with microprocessors.



In 1978 George Perlegos designed the Intel 2816, an Electrically Erasable PROM that eliminated the lengthy UV exposure cycle. Leaving Intel he founded Seeq Technologies with other Intel employees. In 1981, George developed an improved version of EEPROM that could be programmed and erased on the system board for the first time.

The Beginings




George came from Greece to the USA and finished High School in Lodi California. He graduated from San Jose State University in 1972 with a Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering. After, he attended Stanford University from 1972 to 1978 and completed a Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1975. From 1975-1978 George continued take graduate courses at Stanford in the pursuit of a PhD.

In 1972, after finishing San Jose State University, his first job out of college was at American Micro Systems Inc (AMI). In the 1970's AMI was a leading supplier of application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). The first job assignment at AMI was to design a single-chip calculator using MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductor) integrated circuits technology. Using the job description requirements, George enrolled in Stanford University while simultaneously employed at AMI to learn more about MOS processing and circuit design. George stayed with AMI before proceeding to Intel in 1974.